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What You Shouldn’t Say in an Interview

Career Elevation

Welcome Back! Today’s blog/ podcast we will be talking about “What You Shouldn’t Say in an Interview”.

Avoid some phrases or sentences that could get some marks against you. I’d like to help you avoid these phrases and the reasoning behind why you should avoid them. And give you suggestions of what you could say instead.

I won’t do [blank task] or  I can’t– you haven’t even started yet and you’re already telling them that you’re not willing to do what it takes to be in the business, grow personally or help their business grow. Start now, by telling yourself if [person] can do it, so can I!

This reminds me of Kerri Strug, does her name ring a bell to you? She has been an inspiration to me and I often think of her when I think I can’t do something. If you don’t remember her, here’s a little storytime. For the 96’ Olympics, Keri Strugg was the one who got her team convinced that USA can win this year! The team was fed up with the Russians always taking the win and months before the event, she convinced her teammates that this is their year, they will win this year and the team began to work harder than ever at practices. During the Olympics it comes down to Kerri’s turn, she runs and does her vault and when she lands, she injures and sprang her ankle then falls. And because she falls, she has to run and do it again.

I’ve had ankle and foot pain before and I can only imagine what was going through her head. She was the final vault and the final event before metals were announced, it was all down to her! She gathers herself for the final event and she kills it. You can just see the pain in her face in the replay videos, but she knew that she could do it, that there will be pain through this, but on the other side she knew there would be a victory! Guys, she got a 9.7, I seriously look up to this 16-year-old, she is amazing and I want to take this piece of her life and her story and make it my own.

I have a photo of her printed and in my office, when I get off task or think this task is too hard, I think is this what Kerri would have wanted. Now, I have never done gymnastics in my life and I didn’t actually watch the live 96’ Olympics, but her story has inspired me and I hope that next time you think you can’t do something, just think of Kerri, and if she can WIN the Olympics and get a 9.7 with a sprang ankle, you can do any task that you try!

Ok, enough storytime, on to the next.

I don’t know how– It’s tempting to tell someone you don’t know how to do a task that has been asked of you, however, If you tell them “ I’d love to learn how to do that, could you please tell me your method of doing [ task]. This creates feelings of positivity instead of a roadblock.

I’ll try anything or I know I’m over way qualified but… – This question always makes me wonder why they’re “reaching” for your position (if they are actually overqualified). This also sounds like you think you’re “too good” or “over their head”. You never know if the interviewing manager started out in this position, so always be careful with your words. Simply just avoid saying this. If the manager tells you that they think you’re overqualified, you can simply say, I’d love to take my skills and apply them to the job offered.

You guys – Change this to Your team, your staff, your office. You guys just doesn’t sound professional.

What exactly would my responsibilities be? -This implies that you’re only going to do what’s asked of you and not a penny more. As a small business owner, we strive to find people who will go above and beyond, we will always compensate for those who do more, not those who do EXACTLY what the handbook says to do.

Just a heads up or just to let you know -These don’t sound professional and sounds like you may have lots of problems in the future with needing to leave early, come in late, or call off. During the conversation of being hired, let them know of appointments that you have. If they ask during the first interview, tell them, but this must be discussed at the time of hire. Usually, the manager will understand that you have an appointment scheduled ahead of time and allow time off.

I’m sorry what was the question again -make sure to pay attention. If you have a hard time with interviews and you know you get nervous, bring paper and write the questions down. (you should already have a paper and pencil with you anyways!)

I know I shouldn’t say this but – some interviewing managers are really good at getting you to open up, but be very cautious on what you do say, they’re not your friend, you just met you!

No, I don’t have any questions– You should always bring questions to an interview. An area [in the interview] that you’d like them to go over again. This could also sound like you don’t understand the position enough or that you didn’t do your research on the business before or that you don’t care.

Thank you for sharing your time with me. I’d also like to mention that you can get an early bird special if you pre-register for the “Career Upgrades Course”. The course will be released on November 15th, which is just 4 days away! Then on the 15th, the price will go up, so get it while it’s low!

In this course, you will learn how to set yourself aside from the other resumes, update your references, cover letter, increase your interview skills and even help with what you should wear to an interview. Complete with Amazon links to buy some of the clothing, seriously, there isn’t a course out there this complete, get in line now!

Stay tuned next Monday’s podcast/ blog which comes to us from Stephanie. She asks “How do you get someone, or a company for that matter, to take a chance on you when you have no experience other than clinical?” Great question! Stephanie is a dental hygienist, I will broaden this topic and make it more applicable to everyone, yet still answering her question. Next week we will talk about “How to get a company to look at you even if you have no experience”

That’s all for today, I’ll meet you back here next Monday at 9 am!

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Career Elevation

Isn’t it time you took the guesswork out of hiring new employees and started engaging the ones you’ve got? Contact Wendy Aldhamen and the Career Elevation team for advice that is friendly, personable, and knowledgeable.

CareerElevationCE@gmail.com

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